6 Fast-Growing Careers for Nursing Majors

Nursing is a valuable and diverse career, and the sky’s the limit when it comes to choosing a career path. Nursing isn’t limited to slow-moving private practice or the break-neck pace of emergency rooms. Thanks to growing demands, you’ll have your pick of almost any working environment. Take a look at the fastest growing specialties below. Whether you’re studying to become an RN, BSN, or MSN, you’re likely to find good options in these categories.

  1. Home care. If you’re looking to avoid the clinical halls of a hospital, why not work from the comfort of your patients’ homes? Home care nursing is an increasingly popular field, serving patients who would rather recover or convalesce at home than spend time in a hospital bed. You’re likely to see every kind of patient, from an older woman in need of palliative care to a 10-year-old with a diabetic condition. The best part? You’ll visit the same people each week, allowing you to focus on a special few and develop relationships with each one.
     
  2. Geriatrics. The Baby Boomers are getting older. Hospitals and private care facilities are in dire need of qualified nurses to meet the demands. Caring for elderly patients takes a special kind of nurse, one who understands the challenges of aging and can offer helpful insight and an empathetic hand. If you love the idea of caring for your grandparents’ generation, give this option some consideration.
     
  3. Pediatrics. If you’re in favor of the younger crowd, consider pediatrics as your specialty. Pediatric nurse duties cover a broad range of topics, from assessing a baby’s condition to helping a four-year-old with a broken arm. Nurses in this field have a natural love for kids and understand how to communicate at their level. If kids love you, why not use your abilities for the greater good?
     
  4. Surgical. If you’re not afraid of a little blood, why not hone your skills in the operating room? Perioperative nurses set up and assist surgeons during procedures. If you’re more interested in the inner-workings of the body, this path will give you a front row seat.
     
  5. Nurse educator. As the need for nurses rise, the need for nurse educators will rise with it. While you may need a few years of experience under your belt, returning to the classroom setting as a nurse educator is a great outlet for your skills and knowledge. You’ll help usher generations of nurses into the healthcare industry, ensuring that the education they receive is the best. If you love to teach, consider this option as a long-term plan. 
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